Page 41

2016-17 Student Handbook

Since faculty members are ultimately responsible for management of the classroom environment, they possess clear authority to establish reason-able classroom behavioral standards. Exactly which behaviors are “disruptive” may depend upon the size, nature, and format of the class, as well as upon the particular sensitivities of faculty and/or students. Resolution of Disruptive Classroom Conduct. If a student’s behavior is disruptive to the faculty member, to another student, or to the class as a whole, the faculty member may direct the student to leave the classroom for the remainder of that class period. The faculty member is the sole judge of when a student’s behavior warrants such a dismissal. If the disruptive behavior continues when the student returns to class, the faculty member reports the behavior to the dean of students, who holds a hearing. If the hearing does not result in a resolution, the Honor Council is convened to decide whether the student remains enrolled in the class. Complete description of the Honor Council is found in section V of this code. II. The Code of Academic Integrity Under the Code of Academic Integrity, students are on their honor not to cheat, lie or steal, and if they witness another student doing so, it is their responsi-bility to report the individual and the circumstances to the instructor or the dean of students. A. Bribery The offering, giving, receiving or soliciting of anything of value to obtain a grade or consideration a student would not expect to achieve from his or her own academic performance. B. Cheating Examples include: • Any conduct during a program, course, quiz or examination that involves the unauthorized use of written or oral information, or information obtained by any other means of communication. • The buying, selling, sharing of questions or theft of any examination or quiz prior to its administration. • The unauthorized use of any electronic or mechanical device during any program, course, quiz or examination or in connection with labora-tory reports or other materials related to academic performance. • The unauthorized use of notes, laboratory reports, term reports, theses and written materials in whole or part. • The unauthorized collaboration on any test, assignment or project. C. Lying Lying is the deliberate misrepresentation by words, actions or deeds of any situation or fact, in part or whole, for the purpose of avoiding or postponing the completion of any assignment, duties, test or examination in a course, internship or program. D. Plagiarism Plagiarism, or literary theft, in any writing assign-ment: using others’ words or ideas without consistent, correctly formatted acknowledgement. This includes sources the student knows personally (friends, other students, relatives, etc.) as well as all text, Internet, and other sources. Students are required to properly acknowledge sources as follows: students may not present as their own ideas, opinions, images, figures, languages or concepts of another, including those of other students. Students must acknowledge all sources such as magazines, journals, Internet sites, records, tapes, films and interviews. Papers and other materials bought from “term paper writing services,” if submitted as the work of anyone except the writing service, constitute a violation of the principles of this document. Further, violation of any of the following standards may be cause for disciplinary action. The common specific uses of source material are: Direct Quotation: Word-for-word copying of a source. Direct quotation must be accurate, must not misrepresent the source in any way and must be properly acknowledged. Paraphrase: A recasting into one’s own words material from a source, generally condensing the source. A direct quotation with only a word or two changed, added or omitted should not be passed off as a paraphrase. A paraphrase restates the source but does not misrepresent it and must be properly acknowledged. Self-Plagiarism: The act of re-using your own work without letting your professor know that it comes from a previous paper or assignment. This can include parts of a previous assignment or an entire paper. Use of ideas: The use of an idea from a source must be properly acknowledged, even when one’s application of that idea varies from the source. Use of figures, tables, charts, statistics, images, photographs and other similar sources: These items must be fully acknowledged, and any changes must be clearly indicated. If a student has received any kind of help (except that permitted by an instructor) in the preparation of a project, that help must be fully acknowledged. 1‘3186 - ‘17 Student Handbook 134


2016-17 Student Handbook
To see the actual publication please follow the link above