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2016-17 Student Handbook

They are means of bringing student concerns to the attention of the faculty and the institutional authorities and of formulating student opinions on various issues on the campus and in the world at large. In the delegation of editorial responsibility to the students, the University must provide sufficient editorial freedom and sufficient financial autonomy for the student publications to maintain their integrity of purpose as vehicles for free inquiry and free expres-sion Institutional authorities, in consultation with students and faculty, have a responsibility to provide written clarification of the role of the student publications or the standards to be used in their evaluation, and the limitations on external control of their operation. At the same time, the editorial freedom of student editors and managers entails corollary responsi-bilities to allegations, attacks on personal integrity, and the techniques of harassment and innuendo. As safeguards for the editorial freedom of student publications the following provisions are necessary: The student press should be free of censorship and advance approval of copy, and its editors and managers should be free to develop their own editori-al and news coverage. Editors and managers of student publications should be protected from arbitrary suspension and removal because of student, faculty, administrative or public disapproval of editorial policy or content. Only for proper and stated causes should editors and managers be subject to removal and then by orderly and prescribed procedures. The agency responsible for the appointment of editors and managers should be the agency responsible for their removal. All University-published and financed student publica-tions should explicitly state on the editorial page that the opinions there expressed are not necessarily those of the University or the student body as a whole. E. Access and Accommodations Students with disabilities are considered and admitted in the same manner as all other students. Students may request physical or academic accommodations, which will be considered on a case-by-case basis. To receive accommodations, students must complete an intake form and have a collaborative interview with a staff member in Disability Services. Some accommo-dations require significant pre-planning, so students should begin the intake process well in advance of the start of their first academic semester. Documentation: Current documentation from a qualified physician or other licensed professional in a field related to the disability can be helpful in the determination of accommodations. 131 B. Freedom of Inquiry and Expression Students and student organizations should be free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them and to express opinions publicly and privately. Expression may be subjected to reasonable regula-tions of time, place, number of persons, and form under established regulations. They should be free to support causes by lawful and orderly means that do not disrupt the regular and essential operation of the institution and that do not interfere with the rights of others. At the same time, it should be made clear to the academic and larger community that in their public expressions or demonstrations, students or organizations speak only for themselves. Students should be allowed to invite and to hear any person of their own choosing subject to routine procedures provided for off-campus speakers. These procedures should be designed only to assure that there is orderly scheduling of facilities and adequate preparation for the event, that the occasion is conducted in a manner appropriate to an academic community, and that the safety of individuals, the University and the community are not endangered. While the University is properly concerned with the prevention of unlawful conduct, the institutional control of campus facilities should not be used as a device for censorship of ideas. It should be made clear to the academic and larger community that sponsorship of guest speakers does not necessarily imply approval or endorsement of the views expressed, either by the sponsoring group or the institution. C. Student Participation in Institutional Government As constituents of the academic community, students should be free, individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of general interest to the student body. The student body should have clearly defined means to participate in the formula-tion and application of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs. The role of the student government and both its general and specific respon-sibilities should be made explicit, and the student government within the areas of its jurisdiction should be reviewed only through orderly and prescribed procedures. The University should provide sufficient governing freedom and sufficient financial autonomy for the student government to maintain its integrity of purpose as elected representatives of the student body. D. Student Publications Student publications and the student press are a valuable aid in establishing and maintaining an atmosphere of free and responsible discussion and of intellectual exploration on campus. in an academic community. 127 ‘16 - ‘17 Student Handbook


2016-17 Student Handbook
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